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Classroom Number: 137
School Phone:
409-246-3877
Conference Time:
10:30 a.m. to 11:15 a.m.
Jessica Owens

 

My name is Jessica Owens and I will be teaching 3rd grade all subjects! Teaching is my passion and I love what I do! I am a graduate of Lamar University with a B.S. in Elementary Education. This is my fifth year of teaching and I have taught 3rd grade my four previous years. I look forward to this year and it is going to be a great year!

 

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1st 6 Weeks Concepts

ELAR-  This unit bundles student expectations that address the literary elements of fiction in order to examine the narrative subject as a primary means of expression in oral and written communication. Genre study connects reading and writing throughout the year to allow students to become better writers and strategic readers who approach text meaningfully and purposefully, while optimizing understanding and communication. Students are immersed in a variety of fiction to comprehend and communicate authentically about reading and in their writing. Traditional, historical, and contemporary fictional texts provide the avenue for students to learn how to make inferences, summarize, analyze characters, and provide textual evidence during their reading experiences. Understanding is communicated through oral and written expression. Students examine teacher-selected and self-selected literature and media based on individual interest and abilities providing opportunities to make important personal and world connections within and across different contexts.

In Grade 02, students composed texts using the fundamentals of the writing process (planning, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing) in order to express their ideas and feelings about real or imagined people and events. They identified similarities and differences in plot and setting across fictional works and described main characters based on their individual traits, motivations, and feelings. During this unit, oral and written expression become more fluent, automatic, and purposeful as students examine fictional text by sequencing and summarizing the plot’s main events, describing the interactions of characters, and identifying various types of fictional literature. Students also paraphrase themes and supporting details in fictional text. Students continue to use the writing process and the conventions of written expression to explore patterns of language in different literary forms and genres providing a foundation for the formation of creative writing. Sensory language is identified in text and explored in writing to create an experience that appeals to the senses. Vocabulary development increases with the exploration of prefixes, suffixes, antonyms, and synonyms. Word study is inclusive of genre specific vocabulary, literary terms, and appropriate vocabulary from the literature.

Math-This unit bundles student expectations that address composing and decomposing numbers up to 100,000, identifying base-10 relationships through the hundred thousands place, and comparing and ordering these numbers. According to the Texas Education Agency, mathematical process standards including application, a problem-solving model, tools and techniques, communication, representations, relationships, and justifications should be integrated (when applicable) with content knowledge and skills so that students are prepared to use mathematics in everyday life, society, and the workplace.

Prior to this unit, in Grade 2, students used concrete objects and pictorial models to compose and decompose numbers up to 1,200. They represented these numbers using standard form, word form, expanded form, and comparative language, including symbols.

During this unit, students extend their understanding of the thousands period to include the ten thousands and hundred thousands places. Students compose and decompose numbers through 100,000 as so many ten thousands, so many thousands, so many hundreds, so many tens, and so many ones using concrete objects (e.g., proportional objects such as base-10 blocks, non-proportional objects such as place value disks, etc.), pictorial models (e.g., base-10 representations with place value charts, place value disk representations with place value charts, open number lines, etc.), and numerical representations (e.g., expanded notation, word form, standard form, etc.). While examining the magnitude of 100,000, students begin to describe the mathematical relationship between the digits in a number such as the value of each place-value position is 10 times the value of the place to the right. Students continue to build their understanding of the base-10 place value system using multiples of ten and equivalent compositions and decompositions of numbers of the same value. Students also compare and order whole numbers up to 100,000 and represent the comparisons using words and symbols. Ordering three or more numbers may include situations involving quantifying descriptors to specify ordering greatest to least or least to greatest and may involve the location of the numbers on a number line.

After this unit, in Unit 02, students will further examine the role of 10 in the base-10 place value system when rounding to the nearest 10 or 100 to estimate solutions in addition and subtraction. In Grade 4, students will further extend their understanding of place value up to 1,000,000,000 as well as incorporate decimal understanding through the hundredths place. Students will further generalize the value of each place-value position as 10 times the value of the place to the right and as one-tenth of the value of the place to its left.

In Grade 3, number representations and the comparison of whole numbers are identified as STAAR Readiness Standards 3.2A and 3.2D, and mathematical relationships found in the base-10 place value system is identified as a STAAR Supporting Standard 3.2B. All of these standards are subsumed under the Grade 3 STAAR Reporting Category Numerical Representations and Relationships and the Grade 3 Texas Response to Curriculum Focal Points (TxRCFP): Understanding and applying place value and properties of operations to solve problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers within 1,000. This unit is supporting the development of the Texas College and Career Readiness Standards (TxCCRS): I. Numeric Reasoning and IX. Communication and Representation.

This unit bundles student expectations that address estimating, solving, and representing one- and two-step addition and subtraction problems; determining the perimeter of a polygon; and determining the value of a collection of coins and bills. According to the Texas Education Agency, mathematical process standards including application, a problem-solving model, tools and techniques, communication, representations, relationships, and justifications should be integrated (when applicable) with content knowledge and skills so that students are prepared to use mathematics in everyday life, society, and the workplace.

Prior to this unit, in Grade 2, students developed efficient strategies and algorithms to solve addition and subtraction situations with sums and minuends up to 1,000. Grade 2 students also determined the value of a collection of coins up to one dollar using formal money notation, including the dollar symbol and decimal or the cent symbol. Students also experienced the exchange of coins to create sets of equivalent value and to create minimal sets of coins for a given value.

During this unit, students begin by building an understanding of why estimation is a valuable tool for everyday experiences. Number lines and place value relationships are used to round numbers to the nearest 10 or 100. Students analyze numbers in a problem situation to determine the most efficient estimation strategy to use, rounding or compatible numbers. Students use their estimation and mental math strategies to justify the reasonableness of their solutions. Addition and subtraction skills are advanced through solving one- and two-step problem situations that promote the use of place value, properties of operations, and the examination of different representations of the solution process (e.g., base-10 blocks, open number lines, pictorial models, and/or equations). Extensions of these operations include determining the value of a collection of coins and bills as well as determining the perimeter of a polygon.

After this unit, in Unit 09, students revisit addition and subtraction strategies. They will further their understanding of numbers and operations, continue to develop their number sense, and gain fluency in addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division within one- and two-step problem situations.

In Grade 3, representing and solving one- and two-step problems involving addition and subtraction are identified as STAAR Readiness Standards 3.4A and 3.5A, and rounding numbers or using compatible numbers to estimate solutions to problems is identified as a STAAR Supporting Standard 3.4B. All of these standards are subsumed under the Grade 3 STAAR Reporting Category: Computations and Algebraic Relationships and the Grade 3 Texas Response to Curriculum Focal Points (TxRCFP): Understanding and applying place value and properties of operations to solve problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers within 1,000. Representing numbers on a number line between consecutive base-10 multiples, identified as STAAR Supporting Standard 3.2C in the STAAR Reporting Category: Numerical Representations and Relationships, as well as determining the value of a collection of coins and bills, identified as STAAR Supporting Standard 3.4C in the STAAR Reporting Category: Data Analysis and Personal Financial Literacy, are also subsumed within the Texas Response to Curriculum Focal Points (TxRCFP): Understanding and applying place value and properties of operations to solve problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers within 1,000. Determining the perimeter of a polygon is identified as STAAR Readiness Standard 3.7B in the STAAR Reporting Category: Geometry and Measurement. This standard is subsumed within the Texas Response to Curriculum Focal Points (TxRCFP): Describing characteristics of two- and three-dimensional geometric figures, including measureable attributes. This unit is supporting the development of the Texas College and Career Readiness Standards (TxCCRS): I. Numeric Reasoning; II.D. Algebraic Reasoning – Representations; IV.C. Measurement Reasoning – Measurement involving geometry and algebra; VIII. Problem Solving and Reasoning; IX. Communication and Representation; and X. Connections.

Science- This unit bundles student expectations that introduce safe practices, setting up and using the science notebook, and collecting weather data. Students immediately begin the process of working like a scientist to set the stage for scientific inquiry throughout the year. Please refer to the TEKS Resource System Resource “Science Notebooking: A Reflective Tool for Assessing Student Understanding” (Elementary) for more information. Students focus on skills used in scientific inquiry, such as observing, selecting, and using appropriate tools; measuring; and using simple tables, charts, and graphs to display data. Students begin to recognize the difference between observed and measured data. The purpose of observing, measuring, and recording weather data is to give a purpose and context for setting up and using the notebook. The actual content of weather will be addressed in Unit 06, Investigating Weather. Collecting data on a regular basis over time allows students to begin to recognize patterns in our natural world. Students collect data for air temperature, precipitation, and wind direction using appropriate equipment that measures in metric units, where appropriate. Teachers should determine the frequency with which local weather data will be collected over time.

This unit bundles student expectations that examine physical properties and how those properties determine how matter is classified, changed, and used, including  temperature, mass, magnetism, the ability to sink or float, state of matter, changes in state, and the Sun as a source of energy for the water cycle. The appropriate tools and safe practices to investigate the physical properties of matter are addressed. Students accumulate more sophisticated information about the physical properties of matter as they become increasingly familiar with metric units of measurement. The study of matter lends itself to inquiry-based experiences that capitalize on students’ natural curiosity about the physical world around them. Through these experiences, students model the processes used by scientists to study and better understand the natural world.

Students use a variety of tools and equipment to measure, test, and record temperature, mass, magnetism, and an object’s ability to sink or float. Students examine and create mixtures. They describe and classify samples of matter as solids, liquids, and gases. Students predict, observe, and record changes in the states of matter caused by heating and cooling. The idea of heat as a form of energy comes into play in this unit. Change in state or phase can be accomplished by subjecting matter to heating and cooling (the addition and reduction of heat). Water is the most familiar substance used to demonstrate change of state, and those changes can be linked back to benchmark temperatures on the thermometer. Students at this level may not distinguish between heat and temperature, but they begin to see that heat is one form of energy that can change matter. By Grade 3, students have used a thermometer to measure the relative temperature of a variety of substances. In this unit, students become more familiar with the Celsius scale and develop personal referents for familiar benchmark temperatures, including temperature points related to changes in the state of water. Finally, students describe and illustrate the effects of the Sun’s energy on matter, including those related to the water cycle.

Students continue to use science notebooks, not only as a record of their observations and data, but as a tool to construct meaning from their experiences. Students collect data by observing and measuring using the metric system and construct graphic organizers, simple tables, charts, and bar graphs to organize, examine, and evaluate measured data. Furthermore, students analyze and interpret patterns in data to construct reasonable explanations based on evidence from investigations and continue to communicate valid conclusions (supported by student-collected data) in writing, by drawing pictures, and through verbal discussion. Additionally, students are introduced to the idea that repeated investigations may increase the reliability of results.

 

Social studies- This unit bundles student expectations that address the concept of community. Community can refer to people who live together in a common location, as well as to a group of people who are associated by a common bond, such as culture or occupation. Mastery of this definition is foundational to students understanding the Grade 3 curriculum focus on community. Students benefit from understanding that they are members of multiple communities, including the classroom, the school, and a particular locale.  Along with mastering the definition of communities, it is important for students to study the reasons why communities are formed in order to understand the world in which they live.

Prior to this unit, in Kindergarten students learned about community in the context of family, the classroom and the school. In Grade 1- Grade 2 students expanded their understanding of community to include being American. During this foundational unit, students learn about why communities are formed and about terms of chronology in order to study the historical creation of communities.

In the next unit students learn about the purpose of the Declaration of Independence, U.S. Constitution, and Bill of Rights in the context of Celebrate Freedom Week.

This unit bundles student expectations that address state and federal mandates for celebrating Celebrate Freedom Week, including studying the Constitution, Bill of Rights, and Declaration of Independence. All public schools receiving federal funds must provide students with lessons about the Constitution on this day (September 17). Additionally, Texas Education Code §29.907 designates the week of Constitution Day as Celebrate Freedom Week. Requirements from the Introduction (Grade 3 TEKS, (a) Introduction (7)(A)(B)) are listed below.

(7) State and federal laws mandate a variety of celebrations and observances, including Celebrate Freedom Week.

(A) Each social studies class shall include, during Celebrate Freedom Week as provided under the TEC, §29.907, or during another full school week as determined by the board of trustees of a school district, appropriate instruction concerning the intent, meaning, and importance of the Declaration of Independence and the U.S. Constitution, including the Bill of Rights, in their historical contexts. The study of the Declaration of Independence must include the study of the relationship of the ideas expressed in that document to subsequent American history, including the relationship of its ideas to the rich diversity of our people as a nation of immigrants, the American Revolution, the formulation of the U.S. Constitution, and the abolitionist movement, which led to the Emancipation Proclamation and the women's suffrage movement.

(B) Each school district shall require that, during Celebrate Freedom Week or other week of instruction prescribed under subparagraph (A) of this paragraph, students in Grades 3-12 study and recite the following text: "We hold these Truths to be self-evident, that all Men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the Pursuit of Happiness--That to secure these Rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just Powers from the Consent of the Governed."

Prior to this unit of study, in Kindergarten through Grade 2, students have learned about citizenship in the context of the responsibilities expected of citizens as well as about the symbols, celebrations, and customs of America. During this Grade 3 unit, students develop an understanding of the deeper meaning of the founding documents. A study of the purpose of the Declaration of Independence, the U.S. Constitution, and Bill of Rights is important for understanding the importance of freedom and rights afforded in American society.

In the next unit students study about geographic patterns by using maps and globes as tools and by examining human geographic characteristics of communities